BF1942 - Operation Weserubung

File Info: BF1942 - Operation Weserubung

Title:
BF1942 - Operation Weserubung
Author:
TA_Radar & KB
Created:
6/18/2003
Updated:
11/12/2004
Downloads:
 
User Rating

/5.0

Description: BF1942 - Operation Weserubung

This is a conqest map based on Operation Weserubung, known as the German attack on Norway in the beginning of World War 2.


Hitler began planning the occupation of Norway and Denmark under the code-name "Weserübung," or "Wesser Exercise." His original plans called for a neutral Scandinavia, but after time he feared northern Europe could be used against him. Consequently he sought to establish his forces there before the Allies, who had their own plans in the region. A British-controlled Norwegian coastline would directly threaten German positions along the Baltic Sea, as well as impose a costly blockade. Hitler wanted Norway for its valuable resources, especially its iron ore, a necessary war material, which was exported from the northern Norwegian port of Narvik.

Norway would also serve as the perfect strategic naval and aerial base to attack England and Hitler boasted that "weakness in numbers will be made good by skillful action and surprise in execution." For the most part, Hitler was right. The Norwegian armed forces, later headed by Maj. Gen. Otto Ruge, would not be able to defend such a long stretch of coastline. The Germans planned to make them surrender by gaining control of the Norwegian ports and the capital city of Oslo. Britain had a similar plan, but was designed to protect Norway from the Germans. Initially the British were unsure of what course of action to take, and decided to mine the waters between Norway and its offshore islands, known as the "Norwegian Leads." Dubbed "Operation Wilfred," this would prevent German ships from sneaking through neutral waterways.

The British also planned to send in troops to secure the ports and convert the port city of Narvik to an Allied naval base. They told Norway and Sweden if they allowed the Germans to use Scandinavian sealanes for any reason that they would lose their neutrality status. This was something to consider because both countries wanted desperately to stay neutral like they did in the First World War. The German ships sailed on 7 April 1940, the same day the British ships set sail to mine the Norwegian waterways, and mining began the following day. Under the command of General Nicholas von Falkenhorst, the Germans were set for an invasion with approximately 9,000 troops aboard 71 ships.

Less Information
More Information »

Related Information